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Books to read this week

Novel:

Novels to read part 3

   I know I have been stalling in my duties. Did I tell yiu that I was going writing  jamb next tomorrow.

You all know J was going to write jamb before or I didn’t post about it? If I didn’t I will post it again. And I have been trying to read for my exams next week and I am writing like 3 different blog posts at once. So please accept this small token from my heart. I didn’t know I was going to write anything because this week nobody viewed my blog but today someone did. And I had the motivation of writing something.

1: Secret lives of baba segis wives

Novel  by Lola Shoneyin

African-born poet Lola Shoneyin makes her fiction debut with The Secret Lives of Babi Segi’s Wives, a perceptive, entertaining, and eye-opening novel of polygamy in modern-day Nigeria. The struggles, rivalries, intricate family politics, and the interplay of personalities and relationships within the complex private world of a polygamous union come to life in The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s Wives—Big Love and The 19th Wife set against a contemporary African background.

For a polygamist like Baba Segi, his collection of wives and a gaggle of children are the symbol of prosperity, success and validation of his manhood. Everything runs reasonably smoothly in the patriarchal home, until wife number four intrudes on this family romance.

Bolanle, a graduate amongst the semi-literate wives, is hated from the start. Baba Segi’s glee at bagging a graduate doesn’t help matters. Worse, Bolanle’s arrival threatens to do more than simply ruffle feathers. She’s unwittingly set to expose a secret that her co-wives intend to protect, at all costs.

Lola Shoneyin’s light and ironic touch exposes not only the rotten innards of Baba Segi’s polygamous household in this cleverly plotted story. It also shows how women not educated or semi-literate, women in contemporary Nigeria can be as restricted, controlled and damaged by men – be they fathers, husbands, uncles, rapists – as they’ve never been. (via cassava republic)

2: Purple Hibiscus

Novel by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Fifteen-year-old Kambili and her older brother Jaja lead a privileged life in Enugu, Nigeria. They live in a beautiful house, with a caring family, and attend an exclusive missionary school. They’re completely shielded from the troubles of the world.

Yet, as Kambili reveals in her tender-voiced account, things are less perfect than they appear. Although her Papa is generous and well respected. He is fanatically religious and tyrannical at home—a home that is silent and suffocating.

As the country begins to fall apart under a military coup. Kambili and Jaja are sent to their aunt, a university professor outside the city.

where they discover a life beyond the confines of their father’s authority.

Books cram the shelves, curry and nutmeg permeate the air, and their cousins’ laughter rings throughout the house. When they return home, tensions within the family escalate, and Kambili must find the strength to keep her loved ones together.

Purple Hibiscus is an exquisite novel about the emotional turmoil of adolescence, the powerful bonds of family, and the bright promise of freedom

3: Stay with Me

Book by Ayobami Adebayo

Novel

This celebrated, unforgettable first novel, shortlisted for the prestigious Women’s Prize for Fiction and set in Nigeria, gives voice to both husband and wife as they tell the story of their marriage—and the forces that threaten to tear it apart.

Yejide and Akin have been married since they met and fell in love at university. Though many expected Akin to take several wives, he and Yejide have always agreed: polygamy is not for them.

But four years into their marriage. After consulting fertility doctors and healers, trying strange teas and unlikely cures—Yejide is still not pregnant.

She assumes she still has time—until her family arrives on her doorstep with a young woman they introduce as Akin’s second wife.

Furious, shocked, and livid with jealousy, Yejide knows the only way to save her marriage is to get pregnant, which, finally, she does—but at a cost far greater than she could have dared to imagine.

An electrifying novel of enormous emotional power. Stay With Me asks how much we can sacrifice for the sake of family.

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